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おかねおくれ


作成:斉藤龍一郎
 *(特活)アフリカ日本協議会事務局長

HIV/AIDS 2014
グローバル・エイズ・アップデイト
Gender in Africa
アフリカの子ども
アフリカ障害者の10年
アフリカ開発会議(TICAD)
気候変動とアフリカ
アフリカと中国
アフリカとスポーツ
アフリカの食料・農業問題
アフリカの石油、資源
アフリカの保健・医療
アフリカのICT
ケニア共和国 Republic of Kenya 大統領選挙と騒乱
ソマリア海賊対策と自衛隊派遣問題
アルジェリア民主人民共和国アンゴラ共和国ウガンダ共和国エジプト・アラブ共和国エチオピア連邦民主共和国エリトリア国ガーナ共和国カーボヴェルデ共和国ガボン共和国カメルーン共和国ガンビア共和国ギニア共和国ギニアビサウ共和国ケニア共和国コートジボワール共和国コモロ連合コンゴ共和国コンゴ民主共和国サハラ・アラブ民主共和国サントメ・プリンシペ民主共和国ザンビア共和国シエラレオネ共和国ジンバブエ共和国スーダン共和国スペイン領カナリア諸島スワジランド王国セーシェル共和国赤道ギニア共和国セネガル共和国ソマリア民主共和国タンザニア連合共和国チャド共和国チュニジア共和国中央アフリカ共和国トーゴ共和国ナイジェリア連邦共和国ナミビア共和国ニジェール共和国ブルキナファソブルンジ共和国ベナン共和国ボツワナ共和国マダガスカル共和国マラウイ共和国マリ共和国南アフリカ共和国南スーダン共和国モーリシャス共和国モーリタニア・イスラム共和国モザンビーク共和国モロッコ王国リビア(旧 大リビア・アラブ社会主義人民ジャマーヒリーヤ国)リベリア共和国ルワンダ共和国レソト王国
※外務省ウェブサイトを基に、国名を表記しています。

○2007年までのニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 〜2007年
○2008年1月〜3月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2008年 1
○2008年4月〜6月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2008年 2
○2008年7月〜9月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2008年 3
○2008年10月〜12月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2008年 4
○2009年1月〜6月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2009年1月〜6月
○2009年7月〜9月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2009年7月〜9月
○2009年10月〜12月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2009年10月〜12月
○2010年1月〜3月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2010年1月〜3月
○2010年4月〜6月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2010年4月〜6月
○2010年7月〜9月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2010年7月〜9月
○2010年10月〜12月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2010年10月〜12月
○2011年1月〜3月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2011年1月〜3月
○2011年4月〜6月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2011年4月〜6月
○2011年7月〜9月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2011年7月〜9月
○2011年10月〜12月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2011年10月〜12月
○2012年1月〜3月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2012年1月〜3月
○2012年4月〜6月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2012年4月〜6月
○2012年7月〜9月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2012年7月〜9月
○2012年10月〜12月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2012年10月〜12月
○2013年1月〜3月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2013年1月〜3月
○2013年4月〜6月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2013年4月〜6月
○2013年7月〜9月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2013年7月〜9月
○2013年10月〜12月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2013年10月〜12月
○2014年1月〜3月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2014年1月〜3月
○2014年4月〜6月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2014年4月〜6月
○2014年7月〜9月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2014年7月〜9月
○2014年10月〜12月のニュース・情報  アフリカ障害者の10年 2014年10月〜12月

* 主としてアジア経済研究所の「障害と開発」メーリングリストで紹介された記事を収録しています。
  「障害と開発」メーリングリストについては、次のページをご覧下さい。
  アジア経済研究所 森壮也
◆2015/01/04 Vibe Ghana Govt tasked to revise Disability Act
◆2015/01/07 spyghana.com Kumasi/Korea Importers donates to a disability training centre
◆2015/01/07 AllAfrica.com South Africa: 'In Our Communities, Disabled People Are Rejected'
◆2015/01/08 Nyasa Times Rachael Kachaje conquering disability with faith: Malawi ex-minister
◆2015/01/09 Zambia Daily Mail Zambia needs adequate law for the disabled
◆2015/01/17 NewsCrime Human Rights Court Throws Out Case Against Disabled Federation
◆2015/01/18 Information Nigeria Match Made In Heaven! Deaf & Dumb Couple Wed In Lagos
◆2015/01/19 Radio Tamazuj S Sudan: conflict hinders War Disabled and Orphans Commission
◆2015/01/21 Ghanaian Chronicle Ghana: Airtel Ghana Honours Promise to Visually Impaired Student
◆2015/01/22 AllAfrica.com Africa: Focus On Disability - Universal Healthcare Can Happen
◆2015/01/22 Nyasa Times Malawi Council for Handicapped teach sign language relatives of the deaf
◆2015/01/22 AllAfrica.com South Africa: Strategic Disability Policy Framework Needed Urgently, Says Minister
◆2015/01/22 GhanaWeb TB Joshua connects pipe to Savelugu school for the deaf
◆2015/01/22 SomalilandPress Somaliland:First Lady Donates 30 Laptops to Togdheer School of Deaf
◆2015/01/23 AllAfrica.com Malawi: MACOHA in Sign Language Training for Relatives of the Deaf
◆2015/01/24 Zambia Daily Mail Ensuring disability-friendly facilities
◆2015/01/24 Zimbabwe Independent Zimbabwe: Disability Levy On the Cards
◆2015/01/27 Pulse Nigeria Watch disabled man on whelchair joggle the ball just as well as Ronaldo, Messi
◆2015/01/28 The Star Kenya: Special Fund Appeal for Parents With Disabled Kids
◆2015/01/28 spyghana.com Koforidua Hospital strategize to better communicate with hearing impaired patients

【参考website】
■Child-friendly text of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (Word/PDF)
http://www.unicef.org/voy/takeaction/takeaction_cfc_questionnaire.php
■International Rehabilitation Review, December 2007 - Vol. 56, No. 1, SPECIAL EDITION
(PDF)http://www.unicef.org/voy/takeaction/takeaction_cfc_questionnaire.php
(Word)http://www.riglobal.org/publications/RI_Review_2007_Dec_WORDversion.doc
■CBRトレーニングコースの情報
http://www.enablement.nl/(概要)
http://www.enablement.nl/pdf/newsletter6.pdf(コース関連や詳しい情報)
■アジア太平洋/中東/アフリカ地域における障害関連の資料(小説、論文等)のリスト
www.independentliving.org/docs7/miles200807.html(html)
www.independentliving.org/docs7/miles200807.pdf(pdf)
This annotated bibliography lists a selection of 130 novels, short stories, biographies, autobiographies, materials from philosophy, anthropology and folklore, and literary criticism, in which disability, deafness or mental disorders play some significant part, from East Asia, South Asia, the Middle East and Africa, available mostly in English or French.
■WHOから途上国の車椅子ユーザーのための新ガイドライン
http://www.who.int/disabilities/publications/technology/wheelchairguidelines/en/index.html
■世界ろうあ連盟の途上国を中心としたろう者の人権状況の世界的調査報告
http://www.wfdeaf.org/projects.html
■座談会「視覚障害者が高等教育機関で学ぶ スーダンと日本の経験を語る」(2007年8月9日)
http://www.arsvi.com/2000/070809.htm
■座談会「大学における視覚障害者支援の現状と課題 スーダンで今求められていること」(2008年6月21日)
http://www.arsvi.com/2000/080621.htm
■立命館大学生存学研究センター報告12「視覚障害学生支援技法 増補改訂版」
http://www.arsvi.com/b2010/1003as.htm
■GPDD(グローバル・パートナーシップ・フォー・ディスアビリティ・アンド・デヴェロップメント)
http://www.gpdd-online.org/
『障害と開発』分野の国際的なネットワークのウェブ・ページです。

【Related Sites】
○スーダン障害者教育支援の会 http://capeds.org
【参考図書】
○アフリカNOW 78号 特集:アフリカ障害者の10年〜アフリカの障害者の取り組みは今
2007年10月20日発行 一部500円(送料実費) 必要な方はAJF事務局こちらへ
内容 ○アフリカNOW第83号 特集 アフリカにおける民主化の課題
「アフリカにおける民主化の課題」を特集したアフリカNOW第83号を発刊しました。

特集の内容は以下の通りです。
* アフリカにおける平和の定着と民主化の課題  武内進一
* ケニア:2007年選挙後暴力を裁く特別法廷の設置  永岡宏昌
* 【資料】ケニア選挙後暴力究明委員会報告(要旨)

「アフリカの現場から」では、ガーナでエイズ対策隊員としてろう学校でのエイ
ズ教育に取り組み、障害者の社会参加に関わる活動をしてきたAJF会員がレポー
トしています。

アフリカの現場から−ガーナにおける障害者の社会参加促進活動  南口美佳

また、アフリカを伝える新しい取り組みの紹介もあります。
* 「POP AFRICA アフリカの今にのる?!」参加して考えたこと  茂住衛
* 【映画紹介】エンタングル・イン・トーキョー パート1:罪の報酬  川田薫

○アフリカNOW第85号 特集 在日アフリカ人・コミュニティと共に生きる
2009年7月31日発行
頒価500円(+送料) 必要な方はAJF事務局(info@ajf.gr.jp)に連絡下さい

目次
特集1 在日アフリカ人・コミュニティと共に生きる
小島美佐さんに聞く 在日アフリカ人ファミリーとして誇りを持って生きてい
くために
報告:アフリカンキッズクラブのこれまでの実施イベント
在日アフリカ人コミュニティへのHIV/AIDS予防啓発活動に取り組んで 川田薫
特集2 アフリカの障害者と障害者運動の現状
The situation of disabled people in Zimbabwe by Alexander M. Phiri
翻訳:ジンバブエにおける障害者の現状/アレクサンダー・ピリさん紹介
The situation of youth with disabilities in Uganda by Aggrey Olweny
翻訳:ウガンダにおける障害を持つ若者の状況/アグレイ・オルウェニさん紹介
アフリカの現場から:ガーナ 小中学校における性教育とエイズ予防啓発 宮本
佐知子
書評:小倉充夫著「南部アフリカ社会の百年」 近藤帝
ひとつの結び目として・活動日誌 AJF事務局

○障害と開発 途上国の障害当事者と社会
森壮也編 アジア経済研究所

上記の本は、下記の研究会の報告書である。
http://www.ide.go.jp/Japanese/Research/Project/2006/429.html

本の巻末にテキスト・データの引換券が付いており、視覚障害者等のためのテキスト・データの提供もしている。

○『アジア経済 Vol.49, No.2』 「貧困のミクロ経済分析−貧困の罠を用いた文献理解」
伊藤成朗 ¥1,050 B5判 平均104頁 2008年2月

障害についても若干の言及がある他、エンタイトルメント不足を貧困の原因ととらえる視点から、
その解決策を経済学的に模索する論文です。

インターネットでは以下の箇所から注文できます。
http://www.ide.go.jp/Japanese/Publish/Ajia/

○アジア経済研究所叢書4 貧困削減戦略再考
- - 生計向上アプローチの可能性 - -

山形辰史編 ¥4,620円(本体 4,400円 + 税5%) A5判 280頁 2008年3月27日 [amazon]

この本の元になった研究会は、以下のものです。
http://www.ide.go.jp/Japanese/Research/Project/2006/421.html

インターネットでは以下の箇所からも注文できます。
http://www.iwanami.co.jp/.BOOKS/00/6/0099730.html
http://www.7andy.jp/books/detail?accd=32042401
http://item.rakuten.co.jp/book/5543197/

アフリカと政治 紛争と貧困とジェンダー 改訂版
戸田真紀子著 お著の水書房 2,400円+税 2013年9月 [amazon]


天理大学の戸田さんが、新著「アフリカと政治 紛争と貧困とジェンダー」を送ってくれました。
「わたしたちがアフリカを学ぶ理由」とのサブ・タイトルも付された本は、内容がもりだくさんで、論じられている事象や地域についてなじみがない人にはちょっととっつきにくいかなと感じました。
ケニアの女性が立ち上げて運営するママ・ハニ孤児院を紹介する終章「立ち上がる草の根の人々とその声」、次いであやうく「姦通罪」への処罰としての石打ち刑で殺されるところであったアミナ・ラワルさんが直面したナイジェリアの政治情勢を分析する第7章「女性だけが背負う重荷」と読み進め、そこで論じられている問題を読み解くために他の章を読むという読み方がありそうだなと思いました。

序章 アフリカを勉強する10の理由
第1部 アフリカの「民族紛争」の神話と現実
 第1章 アフリカの「民族」とは何か
 第2章 アフリカの民族紛争の「神話」
 第3章 突出する紛争犠牲者
 第4章 選挙民主主義が紛争を生み出す矛盾
 第5章 ナイジェリアの宗教紛争
第2部 ジェンダーから見るアフリカ
 第6章 アフリカの女性と「人間の安全保障」
 第7章 女性だけが背負う重荷
終章 立ち上がる草の根の人々とその声

序章のコラム、アフリカ援助に要する資金が全世界の軍事費の20分の1にすぎないことを紹介する註、そして債務問題がアフリカの子どもたちから未来を奪っていることを告発する記述で、参照されているスティーブン・ルイスの著作もぜひ一読してください。

Race Against Time: Searching for Hope in AIDS-Ravaged Africa
http://www.amazon.co.jp/exec/obidos/ASIN/0887847536/ryospage03-22

○立命館大学生存学研究センター報告6「視覚障害学生支援技法」
2007年8月の東大先端研で、2008年6月に立命館大学でスーダン人の視覚障害学生を
交えて行った座談会をもとに、僕(斉藤龍一郎さん)が書いた「スーダンと日本、障害当事者による
支援の可能性」も収録されています。

目次、入手方法が以下にあります。
送料実費で頒布しているものですので、一読して活用していただけるとうれしい
です。
 
http://www.arsvi.com/b2000/0902as.htm

また、上記座談会記録を収録した資料集「スーダンにおける視覚障害者の現状と
支援のための取り組み」を一部1000円で販売しています。こちらは、AJF事務局
に連絡下さい。

○アフリカのいまを知ろう
山田肖子編著 岩波書店 ジュニア新書 245p 2008年3月

○アフリカのろう者と手話の歴史 - A・J・フォスターの「王国」を訪ねて
亀井伸孝著 明石書店 A5判 254p 2006年12月

○亀井伸孝(2009)「第5章 言語と身体の違いを超えて関係を構築する−アフリカ のろう者コミュニティにて−」
箕浦康子編著『フィールドワークの技法と実際II 分析・解釈編』ミネルヴァ書房所収

○亀井伸孝(2009)「第17章 アメリカ手話とフランス語の接触が生んだ手話言語−フランス語圏西・中部アフリカ−」
梶茂樹・砂野幸稔編著『アフリカのことばと社会 多言語状況を生きると言うこと』三元社所収

○手話の世界を訪ねよう
亀井伸孝著  岩波書店 2009年6月19日  日本語  819円 (税込み)  新書判/縦組/240ページ ISBN978-4-00-500630-4 C0236
詳細はこちら 
http://kamei.aacore.jp/iwanami2009-j.html

○「理解と進歩のためのアフリカ言語学: 第6回世界アフリカ言語学会議(WOCAL 6)参加報告」
 『アフリカ研究』(日本アフリカ学会): 45-47.

亀井伸孝・米田信子著 2009



>TOP

Govt tasked to revise Disability Act

Vibe Ghana-
January 4, 2015 | Filed under: Latest news | Posted by: VibeGhana

The Ghana Federation of the Disabled (GFD) has reminded the government to honour its promise of revising the Disability Act in line with international standards and address the discrimination against persons with disability.

The Federation noted that had been more than a year since the Government promised at the 68th United Nations (UN) General Assembly to review Ghana’s Persons with Disability A ct (Act 715, 2006), but nothing had been done.

Mr Isaac Tuggun, Focal Person of the Federation said this in a statement made available to the Ghana News Agency, over the weekend.

The Federation quoted the Minister for Gender, Children and Social Protection, Nana Oye Lithur, as saying at the 68th UN General Assembly in September 2013, that: “Government is reviewing the provisions of Persons with Disability Act 715 to realign it with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities”.

According to the Federation, the Minister stated that the realignment was to “harmonise Ghana’s obligations under both local and International Law and that “a Legislative Instrument to promote the effective implementation of the Act has subsequently been drafted”.

The Federation said it described then described the promise as “good news and heart-warming information for persons with disability and organizations of Persons with Disability (PWDs) who found the Act to be woefully inadequate, and skewed, with ambiguous and discretionary provisions.”

“Unfortunately, PWDs’ hope and expectations have been short lived,” said the GFD.

“Despite the fact that GFD has produced and submitted a gap analysis report to the Government, through the Ministry of Gender, children and Social Protection, as its contribution to fast-track the review process of the Act, nothing has been done about the said review, after a year now,” it added.

It said an appropriate Legislative Instrument for the effective implementation of an Act could be best drafted after the Act had been reviewed and not while the Act was still being reviewed.

The Persons with Disability Act 715 came into effect in 2006, which preceded the UN Convention on the Rights of PWDs, which Ghana voluntarily signed in 2007 and ratified in 2012.

The United Nations Convention of Disability (CRPD), now part of the body of legislations in Ghana, in Article 4(b) under the general obligations, enjoins state parties to the Convention to harmonize their domestic legislations with the convention.

The GFD said the harmonization would eliminate the difficulties and confusion arising in the application of the two pro-disability legislations, with the same objectives, but which differed greatly from each other in context, enjoinments, and scope.

It said, though disability is an evolving concept, Act 715 had a close definition of a person with disability while the CRPD had an open definition to permit the inclusion of emerging categories of disability.

The GFD noted that CRPD recognized the different needs of women and children with disability and thus provided for them separately, but Act 715 lumped women, children, and men together as PWDs who had common challenges and common needs.

It also said the CRPD provided for political participation of and special needs for PWDs in national disaster management, however, Act 715 was silent on these issues.

“Act 715 has cursory provisions some of which are ambiguous while the CRPD has detailed and clear provisions,” the Federation said.

It said while CRPD promoted inclusive education at all levels, Act 715 prescribed the designation of schools or institutions in each region to provide facilities and equipment to enable PWDs to participate in education, thus limiting the opportunities of PWDs to participate in education.

“This is discriminatory, health care and employment provisions in Act 715 also suffer similar limitations,” it said.

“While the CRPD enjoins close consultation and active involvement of PWDs in decision-making processes, Act 715 prescribes nothing on the matter,” GFD added.

The Federation warned that given the amendment of the Act was an international requirement, and Ghana as a party to the CRPD, Ghana would suffer a “dented international image by signing and ratifying an international instrument only to violate its provision.”

The GFD, therefore, called on all relevant stakeholders to take keen interest in the promise by the government to review Act 715 so that together they could create the right legal environment to improve the disability situation in the country. GNA

【付記】上記ニュースのURL
http://vibeghana.com/2015/01/04/govt-tasked-to-revise-disability-act/




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Kumasi/Korea Importers donates to a disability training centre

spyghana.com
NewsJan 7, 2015 0
SEO Company USA, Website Designing USA, New York | SEOFIED

The Physically Challenged Training and Rehabilitation Centre at Offinso has been presented with cash and food items worth over GH¢2,600.

DISABILITY LOGO

These included,10 bags of rice, a bag each of maize and sugar, one box of sardine, edible oil and large quantity of fruit drinks and were donated by the Kumasi/Korea Importers Association.

Mr. Yaw Anokye Sarfo, Secretary of the Association, said it was their contribution towards efforts at caring for the trainees.

He said helping the physically challenged to acquire trades to become economically self-supporting was a noble cause and something they were proud to be associated with and pledged further visits to the centre.

Mr. Barima Antwi, the Director of the Centre, said they were grateful for the donation, adding that it would give some relief.

GNA

【付記】上記ニュースのURL
http://www.spyghana.com/kumasikorea-importers-donates-disability-training-centre/




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South Africa: 'In Our Communities, Disabled People Are Rejected'

AllAfrica.com-
By Zimasa Matiwane

Holidays are synonymous with children spending time with their families, but there are many children who are forced to spend the holidays without their families. Ntshireletseng Molefe is a caregiver at a home for mentally and physically challenged children in Mount Fletcher in the Eastern Cape. She spoke to ZIMASA MATIWANE about the challenges of caring for children with disabilities.

I did not want to do this job, in fact I hated it, but I think God chose it for me.

It was hard at first to come here and take care of these children. It took time to love the job and, most importantly, to love the children as my own.

This is my 11th year looking after disabled children and although it is difficult work that requires a lot of patience, I have gotten used to it.

But one thing still breaks my heart - the attitude of our communities towards their children living with disabilities.

Out of the 20 children we care for here at Mount Fletcher Cheshire Home for Disabled Children only six were fetched by their parents for Christmas.

Seeing them here alone on Christmas when other children are with their families getting Christmas clothes breaks my heart. I take care of them, I love them, but I know nothing beats a mother's love. Disabled children need a mother's love too.

Those few who children do visit their homes during the holidays come back looking like they were neglected. They get here thin, their teeth looking like they were not brushed since they left Cheshire Home, some come back with sores, others with nappy rash. The parents do not even give them a haircut or remove pubic hair. They even bring them back with dirty clothes.

For instance, Nomonde* is a 22-year-old girl. I found her here, but she only visited home once. Her mother dropped her off, and when we tried to contact her we could not get hold of her. She was eventually traced by social workers, who found her alive and well.

She just deserted the child. That is when December visits stopped being compulsory. The home and social workers decided that those parents who do not want their children can just leave them and never come back.

As a mother I couldn't understand how one would just abandon their own child, but with time I realised that mothers do not have the support required to raise a disabled child. In our communities, disabled people are rejected. No neighbour or mother-in-law or father will change the sanitary pads or nappies of an 18-year-old to assist the mother. They say it's disgusting.

Some of these children eat their own poo. They need special care and without family and community support their mothers, most of them still young themselves, do not cope. It's a sad situation.

Every time I get home and spend time with my children I think of those children at the home whose parents are alive. Some can afford to buy them clothes or visit but don't - they can't even stand to spend a single day with them, or bring themselves to touch them.

It hurts; it is the hardest part of my job.

I wish our communities could be educated about disabilities. Maybe then they can understand that these children are not monsters, but little angels who are different and need love and support just like able children.

*Name changed.

-As told to Zimasa Matiwane

【付記】上記ニュースのURL
http://allafrica.com/stories/201501071078.html




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Rachael Kachaje conquering disability with faith: Malawi ex-minister

Nyasa Times-
anuary 8, 2015
Tionge Ndau -Mana

At knock off time from Chichiri Secondary in Blantyre she thought the rain had receded and crawled with difficulty towards Naperi River to the rickety bridge she crossed on her way home.

Rain fell profusely and the river was swollen and upon reaching Naperi River she found that the bridge was gone except for a pole.

She hesitated for a moment and thought of going back to school, but it was late and her parents and relatives waited in fear with abated breaths.

She thought of the worst, but considered the best was to cross. And with her muddy hands and soaked uniform she clung to the pole and crawled afew steps, but slipped into the river.

Riding the muddy waves in trash, she gave up everything until someone grabbed her hand to safety.

That was the worst day for Rachel Kachaje former Minister of Disability and Elderly Affairs and cofounder of African Women with Disabilities organisation.

She lived in times when being physically challenged was brutally swoon upon and despite having the same or better qualifications than other people, chances of getting employed were close to none.

At age 3, in 1961 she lost use of her legs when she was attacked by Polio that struck Malawi.

Unlike other children who started their education earlier, she started at 8 and was being carried by her mother and sometimes sister to Kanjedza Primary School.

Her parents could not afford a wheel chair and it was some more gruesome years of mobility challenges through primary and secondary schools.

“In 1974 I was selected to go to HHI Secondary School which I attended only the first term due to mobility challenges and was transferred to Chichiri Secondary School where I finished my secondary education.

“And in 1979 after finishing my secondary was not successful to go to the university and I stayed at home for another year,” said Kachaje.

Her father worked for Malawi Broadcasting Corporation and her mother brew Kachasu to make ends meet. They had difficulty supporting 8 children.

She says her hardworking spirit and completion of secondary education was a gift to her family and they were anxious for a brighter future until more mountains arose.

“After I failed to go to university, I started looking for a job and it wasn’t easy to be employed, companies refused to employ people who were physically challenged.

“I stayed at home for a year and Malawi Council for the Handicapped announced on radio that they were looking for girls who had secondary school qualifications and I applied. But I wasn’t even successful, but after some days I was recalled to go to MACOHA that National Bank wanted to employ us,” said Kachaje.

Luckily this time National Bank employed two women and three men and she was employed as a telephone operator.

In 1981 she decided to further her studies at Malawi Polytechnic with the hope of getting a promotion.

Between 1981 and 1984 she attended evening secretarial studies classes, but upon completion, the bank did not immediately recognize her papers. She worked another seven years at the switchboard.

In 1986 she got married to Gibson Kachaje from Nsalu in Lilongwe and same year got promoted to typist and followed her husband to Lilongwe where she worked up to 2001, but was retrenched in 2001.

She has since 2001 been involved in activism for people with disability, Bible and books, born again CCAP, Born on 5 May 1958 as Rachel Kamchacha from Linga Village TA Mwase in Kasungu she has received several awards and recognitions for her work in disability issues in Malawi and Africa in general.

In 2001 Southern African Federation of the Disabled recognized her to be part of them. She was elected chair between 2002 and 2007 and first woman to be chair of the federation.

In 2002 together with friends established Disability Women in Africa an organisation that champions for the rights of disabled women in Africa.

Some of the members are Rwanda’s Matilda Umurza and Hatouma Gakou from Mali who have all inspired a lot of women in Africa.

In 2007 she was deputy chair for Disabled People International responsible for development and was in 2011 re-elected on same position.

And in October 2013 though not being a politician, she was appointed as Minister of Disability and Elderly Affairs.

She is currently working in activism and bemoaned the delays in the enactment of the Disability Act in Malawi as a major obstacle to the rights of the disabled.

【付記】上記ニュースのURL
http://www.nyasatimes.com/2015/01/08/rachael-kachaje-conquering-disability-with-faith-malawi-ex-minister/




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Zambia needs adequate law for the disabled

AllAfrica.com-
By Zimasa Matiwane

Holidays are synonymous with children spending time with their families, but there are many children who are forced to spend the holidays without their families. Ntshireletseng Molefe is a caregiver at a home for mentally and physically challenged children in Mount Fletcher in the Eastern Cape. She spoke to ZIMASA MATIWANE about the challenges of caring for children with disabilities.

I did not want to do this job, in fact I hated it, but I think God chose it for me.

It was hard at first to come here and take care of these children. It took time to love the job and, most importantly, to love the children as my own.

This is my 11th year looking after disabled children and although it is difficult work that requires a lot of patience, I have gotten used to it.

But one thing still breaks my heart - the attitude of our communities towards their children living with disabilities.

Out of the 20 children we care for here at Mount Fletcher Cheshire Home for Disabled Children only six were fetched by their parents for Christmas.

Seeing them here alone on Christmas when other children are with their families getting Christmas clothes breaks my heart. I take care of them, I love them, but I know nothing beats a mother's love. Disabled children need a mother's love too.

Those few who children do visit their homes during the holidays come back looking like they were neglected. They get here thin, their teeth looking like they were not brushed since they left Cheshire Home, some come back with sores, others with nappy rash. The parents do not even give them a haircut or remove pubic hair. They even bring them back with dirty clothes.

For instance, Nomonde* is a 22-year-old girl. I found her here, but she only visited home once. Her mother dropped her off, and when we tried to contact her we could not get hold of her. She was eventually traced by social workers, who found her alive and well.

She just deserted the child. That is when December visits stopped being compulsory. The home and social workers decided that those parents who do not want their children can just leave them and never come back.

As a mother I couldn't understand how one would just abandon their own child, but with time I realised that mothers do not have the support required to raise a disabled child. In our communities, disabled people are rejected. No neighbour or mother-in-law or father will change the sanitary pads or nappies of an 18-year-old to assist the mother. They say it's disgusting.

Some of these children eat their own poo. They need special care and without family and community support their mothers, most of them still young themselves, do not cope. It's a sad situation.

Every time I get home and spend time with my children I think of those children at the home whose parents are alive. Some can afford to buy them clothes or visit but don't - they can't even stand to spend a single day with them, or bring themselves to touch them.

It hurts; it is the hardest part of my job.

I wish our communities could be educated about disabilities. Maybe then they can understand that these children are not monsters, but little angels who are different and need love and support just like able children.

*Name changed.

-As told to Zimasa Matiwane

【付記】上記ニュースのURL
https://www.daily-mail.co.zm/?p=16605




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Human Rights Court Throws Out Case Against Disabled Federation

spyghana.com
NewsCrime
Jan 17, 2015 0

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An Accra Human Rights court has dismissed the conditional appearance suit filed against the Disabled Federation by the Ghana Civil Aviation Authority (GCAA).Disable people

The Disabled Federation sued the GCCA, Antrak Air, Starbow and Africa World Airlines last year over their refusal to airlift a physically challenged person.

The Federation argued that the rights of persons living with disability would be grossly violated if domestic airlines denied them the opportunity to patronise their services.

Meanwhile, the GCAA has explained that it cannot be blamed for the incident.

In view of the above claims, the GCAA, therefore, filed a suit to counter the claims by the disabled federation.

However, the court, presided by Justice Kofi Essel Mensah, dismissed the suit on Friday, paving way for the hearing of the substantive matter.

Earlier in court, the GCAA, led by Mrs Joyce Thompson, counsel for the first defendant, said it wanted the writ to be set aside on the grounds that it did not reasonably disclose any course of action.

Referring to the claims, Mrs Thomson said the Federation was seeking for a declaration to the effect that the GCAA had failed in its duties under the GCAA Act 678 and Section 28(1) of the Persons with Disability Act 2006 (Act 715) to control airlines and regulate local aviation industry in Ghana and ensure that local airlines provide accessible services and facilities.

The GCAA is a regulator of the aviation industry and its Act mandates it to regulate a safe and secure aviation, ensure air transport is carried out in a safe and secured manner through its licensing and certification function, she said.

She said the GCAA regulated but did not provide access to aircrafts for persons with reduced mobility, explaining that they were not responsible for the management of aircrafts in Ghana.

“By law the GCAA’s focus should be on air space management and safety regulations,” she added.

The GCAA’s duty is to ensure safety of passengers, crew, property on board and air worthiness of the aircraft.

Dr Kweku Nsiah, Counsel for the plaintiff, said they vehemently opposed the application on the grounds of incompetence.

He said their application, in pursuant to their entry of conditional appearance filed on December 17, 2014, was another reason for the opposition.

Dr Nsiah said the GCAA was served with the writ on the said date and they had 14 days to move the court to set aside the writ, but their present application was filed on January 12 and, therefore, they were out of time.

Dr Nsiah said the conditional appearance had matured into an unconditional appearance and they could not ask the court to reverse the situation.

The substantive case was later adjourned to April 14.

The Ghana Society of the Physically Disabled has filed a motion on notice, praying the Human Rights Division of the High Court to restrain three local airlines from discriminating against persons with disability by way of refusing to sell flight tickets to them.

It is also seeking an interlocutory injunction against the respondents not to deny such persons who desire to travel on their aircraft services, pending the determination of a substantive suit.

The respondents are Antrak Air, Africa World Travel and Starbow Air.

Joined to the action is the Ghana Civil Aviation Authority, who the applicant wish the court would restrain from overlooking, and or refusing to ensure that the other respondents comply with Section 28 (1) of the Persons with Disability Act, 2006 (Act 715).

Section 28 (1) of Act 715 states that: “The Civil Aviation Authority and any other authority responsible for the management of a port shall provide facilities that will aid the movement of a person with disability at the port.”

【付記】上記ニュースのURL
http://www.spyghana.com/human-rights-court-throws-out-case-against-disabled-federation/




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Match Made In Heaven! Deaf & Dumb Couple Wed In Lagos

Information Nigeria
Posted by: Deolu January 18, 2015

Just found this beautiful report on The Nation about love in its purest and a union between a deaf and dumbcouple..

Their meeting

Through a sign interpreter, Mrs. Helen Famuwagun the visibly elated bride said she lives in Owo and has been looking for a nice and responsible man, which she has now found n her heartthrob, Kunle.

“We met in 2013 and courted for over one year. I know his parents and they too know me and my parents very well,” Omolola announced.”

Asked if the suitors took some time coming, she replied that

“many suitors were coming, but I decided to choose Kunle, for his understanding and caring nature. Kunle is a man after my heart,” she gesticulated to her interpreter, who in turn explained to the reporters.

The couple who both attend GOFAMINT Church said they are happy to have scaled all hurdles to eventually solemnise their relationship. Through their interpreter, Kunle said he does not want any woman in his life, except his brand new wife, Omolola.

The Bridegroom

Kunle disclosed that he met his heartthrob at a friend’s place on May 10, 2013 and immediately took interest in her.

His words,

“I liked her immediately I saw her.”

Asked if he would someday take another wife, he shook his head, gesticulating to the interpreter that he would never consider taking a second or third wife.

He however declared that he would like to have many children, depending on God’s wish.

Their Teacher

My name is Helen Famuwagun (Mrs.), I am one of their teachers in GOFANMINT, what I’ve noticed is that most of them don’t marry normal persons but their likes. This is because they understand each other and are able to interact through sign language. In the church, we teach them that they should not ‘see’ each other before getting married. And this they obeyed because we monitor them very well. We also tell them that their bed must not be defiled, imparting in them the way of God. As a preacher and pastor, I preach to them that it is a sin to make love out of wedlock. Of course we relate with them through sign language, because of their nature and they are well receptive.

Famuwagun also revealed that by nature, people with such disabilities are special people and are very jealous. This she said is why they often married their likes, with whom they share good understanding, and compatibility. She said that such understanding is critical, because they could be very fatal when they get angry.

She also disclosed that this was not the first time such marriage will be taking place.

Boundless joy

The visually impaired sang danced and were all happy. One of them Temitope Ariyo, who is the leader of the School Band, said “we are happy to play for our colleague. Although we cannot see them, they see us. Today is another happy day for the couple “.

Olorunfemi Seun, and Tosin Oladapo, two back-up singers who are also visually impaired also expressed their joy on the occasion.

Bride’s parents

Chief Anthony Adeyeye Onipede and his wife,Taiye are Omolola parents.

According to them, their daughter was not born deaf and dumb, but suddenly observed that she could not talk or hear when she was a toddler.

“Omolola was born as a twin, but her twin sister died at infancy. She was still crawling when we discovered that she could not talk or hear,” the parents chorused.

Onipede said

“I am her father. I did not immediately know that she could not talk or hear. I was in Onitsha then as a soldier .It was my late father who first noticed the problem. We went to places; hospitals and even churches, thinking it was a spiritual attack, but no progress.”

“I made efforts to take her to school. She went to deaf and dumb school in Akure; she also went to Technical College, Owo, where she learnt Painting and decorating”

Asked whether her daughter was forced to marry a challenged person like herself, Mrs. Onipede said

“No, it was Omolola who said she would marry Kunle. They both went to the same school, and I think they would understand each other better. I am happy for their coming together and I am told their children will be normal when they begin to have children.”

Groom’s parents

The parents of the Bridegroom exhibited great joy throughout the occasion. When interviewed, Kunle’s father, Rufus Oluwadare, who is a Shepherd at Christ Apostolic Church (CAC), Akure said

“my son was not born like this. I am the happiest man today for my son to be getting married. I have done two weddings for my two children this year but this is the most interesting and most unforgettable among them all. Yes, they have challenges but see how God has compensated them with this crown? What I know is that if a bad person blocks their way God has a way of compensating them.”

Expressing her joy, the groom’s mother said

“He is very selective and does not seem to want anybody except this lady. They have introduced some divorcees and single mothers to him, but he always rejected them.”

She added that her son was not born with speech challenges. She however blamed her enemies who inflicted the condition on him, when he was a baby. She said

“I believe it is the handiwork of evil doers. But what do we do? We still thank God for everything.”

【付記】上記ニュースのURL
http://www.informationng.com/2015/01/match-made-in-heaven-deaf-dumb-couple-wed-in-lagos.html




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S Sudan: conflict hinders War Disabled and Orphans Commission

Radio Tamazuj-
JUBA (19 Jan.)

Maria Gideon, director for South Sudan War Disabled and Orphans Commission, said they are facing enormous challenges due to the ongoing conflict in the country.

Speaking to Radio Tamazuj, Gideon said the commission’s activities have been paralyzed due to lack of funds.

She said they have failed to assess orphans, widows, and war disabled since fighting erupted in December 2013.

“We could not go to the states to register the orphans, widows and disabled as a result of the war instigated by Riek Machar," she said.

Maria, who is also member of women bloc at the peace talks, said the 2012-2013 budget was passed by the parliament before the fighting erupted and that it is not yet received from the National Ministry of Finance.

She predicted the ongoing conflict could be more devastating compared to wars for liberation struggle between Sudan and South Sudan.

The director called on the two parties to the conflict to end to the ongoing civil war for the sake of peace and stability in South Sudan.

【付記】上記ニュースのURL
https://radiotamazuj.org/en/article/s-sudan-conflict-hinders-war-disabled-and-orphans-commission




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Ghana: Airtel Ghana Honours Promise to Visually Impaired Student

Ghanaian Chronicle-
By Masahudu Ankiilu Kunateh

Airtel Ghana, multiple award winner for its Corporate Social Responsibility initiatives has presented a full educational support package to Michael Kwasi Gator Ahedor, a Touching Lives recipient.

Michael Ahedor became partially blind after completing his Junior High School education and all attempts at seeking medical help for his condition failed leading him to become totally blind. The Airtel Touching Lives initiative offers a platform to celebrate humanity, whilst inspiring hope and enhancing people's quality of life.

It identifies extraordinary people from all walks of life with dire needs and aims at fostering a culture of giving selflessly and nominating extraordinary individuals, who ought to be given a gateway to a better life.

Speaking at the presentation, Airtel's Executive Operations Director for Africa, Christophe Soulet, explained that "Corporate Social Responsibility isn't just about giving to charities and the needy - it's about every aspect of our business and making it part of our DNA. He commended the Touching Lives Program which is making a great impact in Ghana and across Africa with its impactful and sustainable initiatives.

Lucy Quist, Managing Director of Airtel Ghana added that"Airtel Ghana's belief in empowering, enabling and unlocking the power of potential has been exhibited by Michael Ahedor who though visually impaired, did not succumb to his disability.

His zeal to be successful in a society that perceives people with disability as unable has kept him going. He accepted his fate, dared to dream again and reached out for help. His story reminded us that nothing can inhibit a mind that is determined to achieve".

Michael Ahedor, who was visibly moved, thanked Airtel for the kind gesture. The presentation consisted of a full educational support package which caters for the payment of his four year tuition fees, stationery and other school expenses.

【付記】上記ニュースのURL
http://allafrica.com/stories/201501210946.html




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Africa: Focus On Disability - Universal Healthcare Can Happen

AllAfrica.com
By Hannah Kuper

It's now just over two years since the UN endorsed the goal of universal health coverage (UHC). The first ever global day focusing on UHC was held last month (12 December).

The principle is simple: people should receive the healthcare they need without having to suffer financial hardship. But making that happen involves lots of development work, such as building and equipping health facilities, training staff, and designing healthcare systems and financing mechanisms suitable for local conditions.

As we begin an important year for global development - a year when UHC commitments look set to be adopted as part of the UN's Sustainable Development Goals - it's worth reflecting on progress towards UHC.

Philosopher and economist Amartya Sen did just that last week in a piece in The Guardian, writing that "there is ... plenty of evidence that not only does universal healthcare powerfully enhance the health of people, its rewards go well beyond health". [1]

So there are good ethical and economic arguments for working towards UHC. But, as this happens, will some groups be left behind? In particular, will people with disabilities benefit?

There is scant research about the extent to which disabled people are being overlooked by NGOs and others working towards UHC so far. But they almost certainly are.

Up to one in seven people in the world has a disability. My research group has repeatedly found that people with disabilities have greater healthcare needs. [2] They also find it harder to access healthcare, as the WHO has shown in their World Report on Disability. [3] People with disabilities give many reasons for this.

The health centres are too far away. They worry that staff will mistreat them. Many can't afford services or transport. This means people with disabilities often receive less healthcare than other people, and pay more for it. That same WHO report showed that households in poor countries with disabled members spend a third more of their income on healthcare compared with other households. [4]

Put simply, people with disabilities are the ones who need UHC the most, yet if they remain overlooked they are least likely to get the benefits.

There are clear, practical solutions. For instance, health services need to be designed to be accessible for people with disabilities. UHC must be understood to include rehabilitation and treatment of impairments as essentials, not added extras.

Cataract surgery is one example. Cataracts cause half the world's blindness and can be cured with a simple operation, but many people don't have surgery because they can't afford it. Why? They may need financial help, but for UHC to work there are broader issues for governments and aid organisations to consider too: for example organising transport to hospitals.

We also need to collect data on disability as well as health indicators, so countries can monitor whether UHC is reaching everyone. WHO director-general Margaret Chan may well be right when she said that "universal coverage is the single most powerful concept that public health has to offer". [5] Good health drives development, and UHC protects people from poverty.

But countries will not achieve UHC or meet other health-related development goals without recognising that 'universal' means disabled people too.

Hannah Kuper is codirector of the International Centre for Evidence in Disability at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom. The centre is on Twitter as @ICED_LSHTM, and Hannah can be contacted on hannah.kuper@lshtm.ac.uk

References

[1] Amartya Sen Universal healthcare: the affordable dream (The Guardian, 6 January 2015)

[2] Hannah Kuper and others The impact of disability on the lives of children; cross-sectional data including 8,900 children with disabilities and 898,834 children without disabilities across 30 countries (PLOS One, 9 September 2014)

[3] World report on disability (WHO, 2011)

[4] Lena Morgon Banks and Sarah Polack The economic costs of exclusion and gains of inclusion of people with disabilities (International Centre for Evidence in Disability, 2014)

[5] Margaret Chan Universal coverage is the ultimate expression of fairness (WHO, 23 May 2012)

【付記】上記ニュースのURL
http://allafrica.com/stories/201501220774.html




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Malawi Council for Handicapped teach sign language relatives of the deaf

Nyasa Times
Malawi breaking news in Malawi
date">January 22, 2015
Malawi News Agency

In a bid to address communication problems between the deaf who learnt sign language at school and their parents or relatives, Malawi Council for the Handicapped (MACOHA), through Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) Project in Mzimba, has started sign language training sessions for parents and relatives of such children.

One of the family members Left trying to get sense from a brother who has some hearing impairment-Pic by Henry Nkhata

CBR Project Officer in Mzimba, Jackson Chimowa, said his office started organizing such training sessions recently.

“We target parents, relatives or guardians of deaf children who learnt sign language at school such as Embangweni. We want them to start understanding each other,” Chimowa told Mana in an interview.

The CBR Project Officer said apart from understanding each other at household level, those who undergo such training sessions will also act as interpreters wherever they go with such children.

Chimowa said for example, such children would start enjoying church services because they are accompanied by parents or relatives who understand the language they acquired at school and are capable of interpreting what was happening at church.

In her remarks, Shalom Ndovi said she was one of those who attended the first sign language training organized by CBR last year.

She said since that time, communication between her brother Philip Ndovi who is deaf, has greatly improved.

Shalom said she understands her brother better than her father and mother. She is the only one who attended the sign language training session from that family.

“For example at church, Philip sits close to me so that I explain what is happening there for him to enjoy the church service like anybody else,” she said.

She however said the current three day training session was not enough for one to master sign language alphabet among others.

Philip Ndovi said sign language was the only language of the deaf, hence the need for parents, relatives, guardians and even service providers to learn the language.

“Such training sessions should continue for the benefit of the deaf,” he said.

There were 28 participants during the sign language training session at Mzimba boma. Commenting on the duration, Chimowa said his office would look into the matter.

He also said his office would organize another training session for parents, relatives or guardians of deaf children in Mzuzu and Mzimba north.

【付記】上記ニュースのURL
http://www.nyasatimes.com/2015/01/22/malawi-council-for-handicapped-teach-sign-language-relatives-of-the-deaf/




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South Africa: Strategic Disability Policy Framework Needed Urgently, Says Minister

AllAfrica.com-

Pretoria - Higher Education and Training Minister, Blade Nzimande, has reiterated the importance and urgency of developing the Strategic Disability Policy Framework in the post-school education and training (PSET) system.

Minister Nzimande said this during a meeting with the Ministerial Committee on the Development of the Strategic Disability Policy Framework for the Department of Higher Education and Training.

This was the first meeting of the ministerial committee after it was appointed in December last year by the Minister.

It was mandated to identify key challenges in transforming the post-school education and training institutions to universally accessible sites that are disability-friendly and recommend solutions to those.

It will also conduct an overview on the available disability policies at departmental and institutional levels and identify gabs in the provisions of services for persons in the PSET system, among other things.

There are approximately 425 095 opportunities available to applicants within the PSET system, this is an increase of 28 646 opportunities on the 396 449 opportunities provided in 2014. - SAnews.gov.za

【付記】上記ニュースのURL
http://allafrica.com/stories/201501221182.html




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TB Joshua connects pipe to Savelugu school for the deaf

GhanaWeb-
Justice Ajet Nassam SCOAN1

Founder and General Overseer of the Synagogue Church of All Nations (SCOANS) headquartered in Nigeria, Prophet TB Joshua has provided pipe-borne water to the Savelugu School for the Deaf in the Northern Region.

The church's decision was informed by the unwholesome water used by students and staff of the school.

The contractor connected pipelines from the main Savelugu water treatment plant to the school.

The project, which was facilitated by the Prophet's right-hand man, an Accra High Court Judge, His Lordship Justice John-Ajet Nassam cost GHC23, 000, 00.

The project was executed at the request of the school's management in May 2014 when a delegation from the SCOANS led by Justice John-Ajet on behalf of Prophet TB Joshua donated food items, detergents and other valuables to the school.

Commissioning the project on Thursday, His Lordship Justice John-Ajet Nassam exclusively told Citi News it was meant to alleviate the plight of students and staff there.

He said Prophet TB Joshua by the project demonstrated that he was indeed father for all regardless of one's geographical location.

Click here for more photos

His Lordship Justice John-Ajet Nassam promised that the SCOANS will continue to bless more souls by providing basic amenities to the destitute in society.

He commended the contractor for a quality work done and challenged management of the school to maintain the facility.

The delegation on behalf of Prophet TB Joshua organized Christmas party for the students.

Assistant Headmistress of the school, Madam Amenyoku Akuvi commended Prophet TB Joshua and the SCOANS for the gesture.

She confessed saying, "Getting water to bath and clean our places has been a very big problem for us here but since this intervention has come we get water, we drink, we clean, we are so happy: we have no words to quantify our happiness but all that we have to say is Jehovah who is in heaven has seen the good work he has done for us and will continue to support us."

Since its establishment in 1978, the Savelugu School for the Deaf lacked pipe-borne water.

In a related development, His Lordship Justice John-Ajet Nassam's team organized Christmas party for the Nyohini Children's Home in Tamale.

He gave an undisclosed amount to the mother of the Home for the inmates' upkeep.

His Lordship Justice John-Ajet Nassam took notice of their teething problems and assured them of Prophet TB Joshua's intervention early 2015.

He asked the management of the Orphanage to nurture the inmates to be responsible citizens.

Mother of the Home, Betty Aba Anan on behalf of management thanked the SCOANS for the blessing.

She requested for detergents, diapers, potable water, beds and other valuables.

The team further touched the souls of street beggars around the Tamale Picorna Hotel by providing them lunch.

His Lordship Justice John Ajet-Nassam inspired the beggars to have faith in God that all was not lost in life.

【付記】上記ニュースのURL
http://www.ghanaweb.com/GhanaHomePage/religion/artikel.php?ID=343566




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Somaliland:First Lady Donates 30 Laptops to Togdheer School of Deaf

SomalilandPress-
By Goth Mohamed Goth

Burao-Somaliland First Lady Amina Sheik Mohamed Jirde today handed at least 30 laptops and one printer to Burao School of deaf focused on empowering them with skills and training through education so as to better serve their community in the future.

Also addressing the handover ceremony were members of the national deaf association stated the challenges facing the school and for the need to establish a fully-fledged training center for deaf students aimed at providing training in Computer Courses, Typewriting, English and Various Vocational Skills so as to provide a platform to deaf girls to show their talents, and confidence.

The committee stated that the amount of $50,000 would be need to establish such facility and that local businessmen had already pledged to contribute $20,000 but lacked the remaining $30,000 , this prompted the Minister of Presidential Affairs Hon Hersi Ali Haji Hassan speaking on behalf of the current administration to pledge to contribute the reminder $30,000.

Lastly the hearing impaired students presented certificates of appreciation to the First Lady Amina Mohamed Sheik Jirde and the Minister in Charge of Presidential Affairs Hon Hersi Ali Haji Hassan.

On the other hand the First Lady visited the Togdheer home of less fortunate children and orphanage to inspect the ongoing construction of a new building, the first lady donated $100 towards the building on behalf of the government.

【付記】上記ニュースのURL
http://www.somalilandpress.com/somalilandfirst-lady-donates-30-laptops-togdheer-school-deaf/




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Malawi: MACOHA in Sign Language Training for Relatives of the Deaf

AllAfrica.com
By Henry Nkhata

In a bid to address communication problems between the deaf who learnt sign language at school and their parents or relatives, Malawi Council for the Handicapped (MACOHA), through Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) Project in Mzimba, has started sign language training sessions for parents and relatives of such children.

CBR Project Officer in Mzimba, Jackson Chimowa, said his office started organizing such training sessions recently.

"We target parents, relatives or guardians of deaf children who learnt sign language at school such as Embangweni. We want them to start understanding each other," Chimowa told Mana in an interview.

The CBR Project Officer said apart from understanding each other at household level, those who undergo such training sessions will also act as interpreters wherever they go with such children.

Chimowa said for example, such children would start enjoying church services because they are accompanied by parents or relatives who understand the language they acquired at school and are capable of interpreting what was happening at church.

In her remarks, Shalom Ndovi said she was one of those who attended the first sign language training organized by CBR last year.

She said since that time, communication between her brother Philip Ndovi who is deaf, has greatly improved.

Shalom said she understands her brother better than her father and mother. She is the only one who attended the sign language training session from that family.

"For example at church, Philip sits close to me so that I explain what is happening there for him to enjoy the church service like anybody else," she said.

She however said the current three day training session was not enough for one to master sign language alphabet among others.

Philip Ndovi said sign language was the only language of the deaf, hence the need for parents, relatives, guardians and even service providers to learn the language.

"Such training sessions should continue for the benefit of the deaf," he said.

There were 28 participants during the sign language training session at Mzimba boma.

Commenting on the duration, Chimowa said his office would look into the matter.

He also said his office would organize another training session for parents, relatives or guardians of deaf children in Mzuzu and Mzimba north.

【付記】上記ニュースのURL
http://allafrica.com/stories/201501230140.html




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Ensuring disability-friendly facilities

Zambia Daily Mail-
Posted in Editor's Choice, Features on January 24, 2015 by Online Editor
disability wheel chair stroke
GODFREY CHITALU

MORE than one billion people in the world today live with some form of disability; that is one in seven of all of us. Almost everyone alive on the planet will, in his or her life, experience temporary or permanent disability of one form or another.

Before I progress however, it’s important to realise that the term disability is misleading. Human beings can become impaired through physical, mental or sensory limitations; but that does not become a disability until that impairment stops them from participating in community life.

The term is also used (wrongly) as a broad catch-all for a diverse group of people, and used with the conviction by which we categories gender. We say (usually) with some certainty that a given person is male or female.

Unfortunately, we are also just as quick to categorise an individual as disabled or not.

By doing this, we oversimplify and perhaps trivialise the fact that disability ? rather than being something looked upon as a ‘condition’, is really a phenomenon that occurs at a complex intersection between our humanity, policy, society, culture and the environment.

The complexity of the topic combined with significant political and social blindness towards it, has led to disability becoming one of the most significant un-addressed issues of modern times.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, signed on December 10, 1948 supposedly expressed the baseline level of rights to which all human beings are entitled.

For many groups who were marginalised, even this was not enough to defend them.

Specific conventions defending against discrimination on the basis of race, gender and youth were adopted in 1969, 1979 and 1989 respectively.

It was not until the 21st century, however, in 2006, where the United Nations formally agreed on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, aimed “to promote, protect and ensure the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms by all persons with disabilities, and to promote respect for their inherent dignity”.

The word disability is the embodiment of pure negativity and when it is used as a catch-all such as ‘the disabled,’ it is even worse.

Everyone is an individual, and those individual personalities should shine through, not the labels.

Ask a person who is getting older and may have a visual, hearing or mobility impairment if they are disabled? They will throw that title off vehemently! They view disability as being a community they do not belong to.

When we talk of disability, we are referring to over one billion people; 80 percent of whom are in the South, the poorer countries of the world.

Here we are in the 21st century, and we have practically nothing in place for them to protect their rights when it comes to accessibility, education, social-living and more.

We need to shift our mindset, and the world needs to catch up. The past cannot be wiped-away, but the future can be written.

We have to make a pledge that no building in the world will ever be constructed without considering access.

It does not cost a single penny extra, it is a design issue. The world, and our world leaders and opinion makers are yet to realise the full potential of universal design. We need to have a world with infrastructure, built environmentally and services that all of us whether old, young, tall, short, man, woman or otherwise can use with dignity and safety.

Unless there is political will, no change will happen. Most issues facing disabled people can be solved with the stroke of a pen, they do not even need resources. You need resources to correct the damage of the past, but I am writing, we should put that aside for the time being - all the buildings that are not accessible, let us put blinkers on - but why is it so difficult for any government to pass law that means that for the future ? no public building will be constructed without accessibility. When you buy a new bus or new transport system why can it not be accessible.

The reason that some policy makers do not look at disability with the seriousness it deserves is because they do not see disabled people as a potential vote-bank. Historical failures mean that many disabled people are virtual prisoners inside their own homes.

If you go to an average country in the South, you just don’t see that many disabled people.

Is it because they don’t exist? Are there less disabled people in the South than the USA? My contention is that there are more! Because the disabled are not able to step out of their homes, because they have not been able to access education they are unemployed, because they are unemployed they are not empowered. And that’s 1:7 of all humanity that remains unseen, unheard and unaccounted.

The writer is a disability rights activist-E-mail caredisamedia@gmail.com

【付記】上記ニュースのURL
https://www.daily-mail.co.zm/?p=18068




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Zimbabwe: Disability Levy On the Cards

Zimbabwe Independent-

ZIMBABWEAN taxpayers must brace for yet another levy should government approve the ruling Zanu PF party's proposed tax to cushion the country's disabled population estimated at two million.

In its report presented to the party's sixth elective congress in Harare last month, Zanu PF's department for the welfare of the disabled and disadvantaged persons recommended government introduces a disability levy, along the same lines as the Aids levy.

Zimbabwe introduced a compulsory 3% Aids levy to all employees with taxable incomes and their employers in 1999 to fund Aids mitigation programmes.

"... Government was exhorted to establish a disability levy, modelled along the lines of the Aids Levy, as this would assist to ensure that meaningful relief to the economic problems of people with disabilities is introduced," the department wrote in its report.

If introduced, this would add to a long and onerous list of taxes being levied on the country's ever-dwindling workforce by a government whose revenue base continues to shrink.

These include the Aids Levy, National Social Security Authority (Nssa) pension and a high Pay As You Earn (PAYE) tax.

Already workers are unhappy with Nssa which has dismally failed in its stated objective of cushioning pensioners from economic hardships by providing a monthly pension. On average pensioners receive about US$40 from Nssa which is grossly inadequate to pay rentals, water and electricity as well as medical treatment, among a host of bills.

In 2012, former Indigenisation minister Saviour Kasukuwere pushed for the introduction of an indigenisation levy, but his successor Francis Nhema, fired by President Robert Mugabe last month, opposed the move saying "the country has too many levies and it is not appropriate as of now to bring more levies".

Acting ZCTU secretary-general Gideon Shoko said while catering for the disabled is a noble idea, ZCTU is against adding any more taxes as this "stretches the meagre resources of the already over-burdened workers".

"You are talking about taxing the same worker that is already over- burdened with so many other taxes including the Aids levy. You are taxing the small amount that the worker is supposed to remain with," said Shoko on Wednesday, adding government should find other means of funding its cause.

Attempts to obtain a comment from the Public Service ministry were unsuccessful as ministry officials kept referring this paper to different departments and ultimately demanding written questions which they said could only be attended to after permission from the relevant minister, Prisca Mupfumira.

【付記】上記ニュースのURL
http://allafrica.com/stories/201501240430.html




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Watch disabled man on whelchair joggle the ball just as well as Ronaldo, Messi

Pulse Nigeria-

A man sitting on a wheelchair, without movable hands shows his skills with the round leather ball.

Published: 27.01.2015Macaulay Maduwuba PrinteMail

Homeless man shows off football skills (Pulse)

This video on Instagram would inspire the thoughts of the right thinking individual who believes that disability is no limitation to what a human can do.

A man sitting on a wheelchair, without movable hands shows his skills with the round leather ball.

He kicks the ball up and down without it dropping, exerting full control such that a little young boy standing and watching could only marvel at his talent.

His skill on the ball could be likened to that of Cristiano Ronaldo, Lionel Messi and many other football stars on their feet.

【付記】上記ニュースのURL
http://pulse.ng/sports/football/something-to-see-watch-disabled-man-on-whelchair-joggle-the-ball-just-as-well-as-ronaldo-messi-id3437951.html




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Kenya: Special Fund Appeal for Parents With Disabled Kids

The Star

By Nganga Thairu

The government has been urged to help people living with disability and parents of disabled children.

Ambassadors of Goodwill director Sicily Njeri said the disabled are discriminated against in job appointments despite guidelines favouring them.

She gave out second-hand clothes to parents of disabled children at Makongeni, Thika Town, on Sunday.

Njeri said parents and caretakers of children with disabilities have little time to engage in income generating activities.

She said there is a need for a special fund for parents with disabled children.

Njeri called on well-wishers to donate, and facilitate government efforts to help the needy.

She said the Ambassadors of Goodwill group gives the disabled food, wheelchairs and crutches.

Njeri said the caretakers need permanent sources of income instead of handouts.

Speaking at the same event, Rev George Njoroge of Hope and Victory Christian International called on the well-to-do to assist the less fortunate.

【付記】上記ニュースのURL
http://allafrica.com/stories/201501281367.html




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Koforidua Hospital strategize to better communicate with hearing impaired patients

spyghana.com
HealthJan 28, 2015 0

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The management of the Koforidua Regional Hospital is to engage the services of a sign language interpreter to enable the hospital to better interact with patients with hearing impairment who visit the hospital.

HOSPITAL WARD

This is in line with the objective of the hospital for 2015 to ensure that, all clients of the hospital are received as very important personalities (VIP).

This was disclosed by the Medical Director of the Hospital, Dr Kwame Anim Boamah at a media briefing after the 2014 annual review meeting of the hospital at Koforidua.

He explained that, currently, educated patients with hearing impairment communicated with the health authorities through writing, while the non-lettered ones who visited the hospital spoke through their relations who comes along with them.

Dr Boamah explained that the current arrangement would help the health authorities to communicate with patients who were hearing impaired and visited the hospital alone.

He said current medical practice required that the health officers communicated effectively with the patients for the patients to understand what was wrong with them and the type of medication that was being prescribed for them.

Dr Boamah advised clients of the hospital to ask of the name of medical personnel who treated them and also the name of the drugs that were prescribed for them.

He explained that when the patients were engaged by medical personnel and made to understand what was wrong with their health and the support that the prescription given them could offer, it made them to comply better with the directives of the medical officer and also help speed up their recovery.

GNA

【付記】上記ニュースのURL
http://www.spyghana.com/koforidua-hospital-strategize-better-communicate-hearing-impaired-patients/





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